May 25, 2022 In Control, Scammers

Scammers Take Control of Beeple’s Twitter Account to Sent Out a Phishing Scam

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Scammers Take Control of Beeple’s Twitter Account to Sent Out a Phishing Scam

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Mike Winkelmann, better known as Beeple, a digital artist and popular nonfungible token (NFT) developer, had his Twitter account stolen on Sunday as part of a phishing attempt.

Users were warned by MetaMask security analyst Harry Denley that Beeple’s tweets at the time, which contained a link to a raffle of a Louis Vuitton NFT collaboration, were a phishing scheme that would drain crypto from users’ wallets if clicked.

The fraud artists were most likely hoping to profit from a legitimate recent Beeple-Louis Vuitton partnership. Beeple created 30 NFTs for the premium fashion brand’s Louis The Game smartphone game, which was used as player incentives earlier this month.

⚠️ Beeple’s Twitter account has been compromised (ATO) to post a phishing website to steal funds.

0x7b69c4f2ACF77300025E49DbDbB65B068b2Fda7D
0xF305F6073CFa24f05FF15CA5b387DD91f871b983 pic.twitter.com/0MPNwOPlEu

— harry.eth 🦊💙 (whg.eth) (@sniko_) May 22, 2022

Beeple’s phishing scam cost users over $438k

The fraudster proceeded to tweet phishing links from his Twitter account, directing readers to fake Beeple collections with the promise of a free mint for unique NFTs.

The phishing links were up for nearly five hours on his Twitter, and an on-chain check of one of the scammers’ wallets revealed that the first phishing link got them 36 Ether (ETH), which was worth around $73,000 at the time.

The scammers received over $365,000 in ETH and multiple NFTs from high-value collections, like the Mutant Ape Yacht Club, VeeFriends, and Otherdeeds, among others, bringing the total worth of the scam to nearly $438,000.

According to on-chain data, the fraudster sold the NFTs on OpenSea before transferring their stolen ETH to a crypto mixer to conceal their gains.

He later claimed possession of his account, adding that “anything too good to be true IS A F*CKING SCAM.”

Three of the top ten most valuable NFTs ever sold were sold by Beeple, including one that sold for $69.3 million, the highest amount ever paid by a single owner. Hackers have targeted him because of his celebrity.

Customers lost roughly 38 ETH after a Beeple Discord moderator account was hijacked in November 2021, with hackers pushing a similar false NFT drop.

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